Sarah Rose Weitzman explores disabilities that can't be seen


about me:

My name is Sarah Rose Weitzman and I am an artist and designer with a focus in books, photography and illustration. I am currently a design fellow at Ten Speed Press pursuing my passion in book publication and also a resident at Image Flow continuing my thesis in "revealing the invisible." I have an MFA Design from California College of the Arts (CCA) and an BS degree from Skidmore College in Fine Arts and Art History. When not working, I love hiking in the Bay Area, sketching and making clay animal skulls.


You can check my work at here:

https://sweitzman.myportfolio.com/ and @s_rose_weitzman


about my work:

Currently finishing up my art residency at The Image Flow, my work is a continuation of the idea "revealing the invisible." This concept is a continuation of my thesis at CCA, where I received my Design MFA in May 2018. Being an individual that struggles with an invisible disability (I am deaf and wear cochlear implants) I am interested investigating how metaphorical explorations of invisible struggles we all have makes us relatable. My current series at Image Flow focuses specifically on translucent objects, particularly glass as a material and object.










ALTER/ANALOG: How were these images created?


RW: The majority of my work is photograms and therefore cameraless. Photogram is a darkroom technique where the photo paper is exposed to light. Objects are placed on top of the photo paper to create "silhouette" exposures. I primarily use translucent objects, particularly glass right now, to further push my work around "revealing the invisible." This concept is a continuation of my thesis at California College of the Arts (CCA), where I received my Design MFA in May 2018. Being an individual that struggles with an invisible disability (I am deaf and wear cochlear implants) I am interested investigating how metaphorical explorations of invisible struggles we all have makes us relatable.


ALTER/ANALOG: How long have you been a photographer?


RW: Photography is a huge part of my role as a visual communicator - I used it as a medium and form. I have been in and out of the darkroom since high school, attended an amazing workshop in Florence during college, and re-jumped back into it for my thesis last year after my advisor Martin Venezky recommended I do so. I have always been taking pictures, both analog and digital, and thought for a long time I would be a food or wedding photographer!


ALTER/ANALOG: What got you interested in photography?


RW: I was lucky to grow up in such a creative family -- my mother, aunt and uncle were/are art teachers from Albuquerque, New Mexico, and all practiced darkroom and black and white photography. My uncle focused on photojournalism, my aunt on New Mexico locals and experimental work, and my mother on dining still-lives. Such vastly different interests, yet so inspiring to me. I personally love being in the darkroom and feel it’s one of the few places I can let my guard down and be creative.


ALTER/ANALOG: What are you working on next?


RW: I am currently working on ways to push my photograms out of the 2D environment - how will it look animated? On cloth? On a webpage? On a product? I am extremely curious and also know I must continue to push my work forward in developing my ideas deeper. I love being comfortable, but it’s not great for generating new ideas. I am also looking into other artist residencies for the future (I am just finishing up my current one at The Image Flow) and figuring out how to make money as an artist.

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